Chattanooga

For the last couple of years, the Planet Altered Gallery on Chattanooga’s Southside has held fundraising events called CAFE Grant Suppers.  At these events, people pay $12 for dinner.  During the dinner, artists and creative people who could use extra money to fund their work give pitches.  People listen to the pitches, vote, and then the winning artist receives most of the money people paid for dinner–often several hundred dollars total.  It’s a way for the Southside community to gather, enjoy food and fun, and support a local artist.

“I don’t ever talk to anybody who’s older than me,” John Flansburgh says in this interview with WUTC 88.1 FM’s Richard Winham.  Both Flansburgh and Winham have been in the music business for decades.  Winham, the host of WUTC’s afternoon music show, started his radio career in 1972.  Flansburgh’s music career began in 1982, when he and John Linnell founded the band They Might Be Giants.  In this extended, informal conversation, Winham doesn’t exactly interview Flansburgh–instead, these two music-industry veterans wind up interviewing each other, comparing their musical tastes and contrastin

Jonathan Coulton used to write computer programs.  Now he writes about programmers–his songs like Code Monkey are funny, occasionally melancholy ballads about geek culture: burnt-out code warriors, zombie office workers and mournful, lonely sea monsters.

Some stories are meant to be heard out loud.  Particularly, stories from oral traditions, such as the Jack Tales, which originated in Europe.  Immigrants brought Jack Tales to Appalachia, and more than sixty years ago, folklorist Richard Chase collected these tales and published them in print form.

Chattanooga Resident Transforms Mugshots Into Fine Art

Jan 27, 2012

Ron E. Ott finds mugshots taken in Hamilton County, Tennessee, and he renders the photographs into colorful comic-book styled portraits.  He stopped by our studios recently and discussed what inspired him to start using mugshots as the basis for fine art.  He calls his project Chattanooga Mugshots.

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga's 125th Anniversary Celebration continues with a turn of the 20th Century, American opera called, "Treemonisha," by Scott Joplin.

Thomas P. Balázs,  fiction writer and UTC professor, will publish his first collection of stories in late January. The book is titled Omicron Ceti III. NecessaryFiction.com calls Balázs “an inspired and inventive writer resourceful enough to also draw on many diverse sources, cultural and pop-cultural.” Kevin Wilson, the author of The Family Fang, claims Omicron Ceti III is a “dazzling collection [that] boldly goes into unknown territory.” Garrett Crowe spoke with Thomas Balázs about his debut book.

The Association for Visual Arts already has an impact on Chattanooga--they are one of the city's largest arts organizations, with around 600 members.  But now AVA is doing even more to connect with the community.  Anne Willson, the new executive director, joins us to discuss new partnerships between AVA and nonprofits.  Also, Willson discusses a new magazine AVA is producing called The Bridge.

Heartland Chattanooga

Garrett Crowe

Chattanooga, TN – Chattanooga resident Adam McElhaney recently developed a game for iOS devices called Heartland: Chattanooga. The game is an action shooter that presents Chattanooga as the setting for World War III. Garrett Crowe talked to Adam about his interest in video games and the process of developing a iPhone/iPad app.

Some Great Reads You Might Have Missed In 2011

Michael Edward Miller

Chattanooga, TN – Adera Causey is a volunteer book reviewer for the Chattanooga Times Free Press. Each week, the newspaper publishes one of Causey's reviews in the Sunday books section. In this segment, she joins us to discuss books you might have missed in 2011.

FICTION:

Teju Cole - Open City

Jesmyn Ward - Salvaging the Bones

The Folk School of Chattanooga

Rabbit Zielke

Chattanooga, TN – The Folk School of Chattanooga is located at 250 Forest Avenue in North Chattanooga and offers music lessons, workshops and concerts with a focus on folk music, bluegrass, mountain music, Celtic music, and the music of Appalachia. The venue is fairly small so most concerts at the Folk School offer limited seating and a chance for a very special evening with the artist.

Sixty Years After Her Death, Anna Houston Is Still A Mystery

Michael Edward Miller

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