Books

Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic join us to discuss their new bestseller INDIANAPOLIS: The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man.

They'll have a book signing at Chattanooga's Star Line Books on 8/4 at 6 pm.

WUTC

After writing two novels for adults and a short-story collection, Chattanooga author Janie Dempsey Watts has published her first book for children, Pap Pap Goes to Paris: And so does Ricky. She joins us to talk about it.

Publisher's description:

Seeing a snow globe of the Eiffel Tower, Ricky wants to go to Paris with his grandfather to climb the famous monument.

After convincing his parents, he travels to Paris and experiences everything from cobblestones to croissants.

He sees the gigantic tower up close, and wonders how he will make it up the almost 700 stairs. With encouragement from his grandfather, Ricky tackles the stairs and learns the importance of teamwork and persistence.

Sybil Baker’s While You Were Gone is the story of three sisters dealing with their father's death and uncovering secrets about him and other relatives who have passed away. They grow up in a large house on beautiful Missionary Ridge overlooking Chattanooga, and their extended family is part of the city's upper class. But the sisters feel shunned, and slowly learn why their family is fractured.

This Saturday, June 23rd, The Chattanooga Readers and Writers Fair is celebrating writing and reading from 10 am until 4:30 pm in the Chattanooga City Library. Writers will be reading from their work in the auditorium on the main floor, while on the 2nd floor there will be entertainment for the children. There will also be readings on the 4th floor, and vendors will be setting up booths on the 4th floor as well. From 12 noon until 1pm there will be an open mic on the plaza in front of the library along with food vendors for lunch. Richard Winham talked to Sherry Poff from the Chattanooga Writers’ Guild as well as three of the writers –Finn Bille, Dana Shavin and Paul Luikart—who will be at the fair on Saturday.

Austin Kleon visits Chattanooga on Wednesday, June 20th for an event at the Downtown Public Library at 6 pm. Kleon's Steal Like An Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative is the first selection in Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke's Books With Berke club, examining themes of creativity, collaboration and changing the world. 

Why is Ernest Hemingway still so well-known decades after his death, but not his friend/contemporary John Dos Passos?

In this interview, James McGrath Morris, author of the biography The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and a Friendship Made and Lost in War, joins us to talk about it.

Co-authors Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak join us to discuss The New Localism: How Cities Can Thrive In the Age of Populism. The book says power is shifting in the world, downward from national governments to cities and metropolitan communities, and gives examples of local government's positive impact in several cities, including Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Dave Connis's young adult novel The Temptation of Adam is about a boy recovering from a type of addiction rarely seen in books for teens, something that’s uncomfortable to acknowledge. So the protagonist, 16-year-old Adam Hawthorne, starts the story in denial.

Adam is addicted to pornography.

Southern author Janie Dempsey Watts has written two novels: Moon Over Taylor's Ridge​ and Return to Taylor's Crossing. Both were set in North Georgia, the area where she resides. But she’s also spent decades in California and traveled globally. Her newest work is a collection of short stories, Mothers, Sons, Beloveds, and Other Strangers​, and the collection is divided, geographically, into three sections: stories set in the South, stories set in California, and stories in Europe.

Leah Weiss's debut novel If the Creek Don't Rise features an unusual storytelling structure: each chapter is told from one character's point of view, so the story is revealed through ten different voices. Set in 1970s Appalachia, it's about Sadie Blue, a pregnant teenager who must free herself from an abusive marriage, and about others in town--especially women--who help her. 

“Are we really done with windows?” asks one of the characters in Courtney Maum’s new novel Touch.

He’s not talking about the operating system.

“I mean the architectural component that lets in light,” he says. “I mean, if I have a window, then—and this is really modern—I can just look through it and decide all by myself how to dress. I don’t need my home automation system to send me a text.”

Paula Poundstone

The red Lamborghini did little to improve Paula Poundstone's mood.

She says she was "feeling like a jerk" as she drove it through Los Angeles, a self-inflicted experiment to discover the secret to happiness.

"We live in a world where there's a lot of people who don't have homes," she says. "And who wants to drive by that in a Lamborghini? You know, I don't like walking by it to get on the train. So it just it creates a much more stark reminder of the inequities, you know, the imbalance in in our world. And you know normally I just walk down the street feeling helpless to help people."

She also tried camping, taekwondo, volunteering and other activities as she searched for deep personal satisfaction. Some became habits.

Robert M. Pirsig, who inspired generations to road trip across America with his "novelistic autobigraphy," Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, died Monday at the age of 88.

His publisher William Morrow & Company said in a statement that Pirsig died at his home in South Berwick, Maine, "after a period of failing health."

The idea for Tennessee author/biologist David George Haskell's new book The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors came from an almost offhand remark he made while teaching at The University of the South in Sewanne. 

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