Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a political correspondent for NPR. He covers the 2020 presidential campaign and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015. He reported on the 2016 presidential election, then worked for two years as a congressional correspondent before shifting his focus back to the campaign trail.

Before that, he worked as a statehouse reporter in both Pennsylvania and California, for member stations WITF and KQED. He also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, and also has a master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is defending his record on Social Security, amid increased criticism from the campaign of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, which has repeatedly pointed to Biden's willingness as a U.S. senator to back spending freezes for Social Security and other entitlement programs.

The candidates' back-and-forth culminated — as most disputes in modern presidential campaigns do — in dueling Twitter posts Tuesday night.

How confident are Iowa Democrats in their choices, now two weeks out from the caucuses?

The response Renee Kleinpeter gave NPR when asked which candidates she has narrowed her choice down to could sum it up: four seconds of laughter.

"I'll go with anybody who could beat [President] Trump," she said after laughing. "I wish somebody could tell me."

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Updated at 5:11 p.m. ET

Leading Democratic presidential candidates on Tuesday blasted President Trump's decision to kill Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, casting it as a dangerous escalation in a volatile region.

Former Vice President Joe Biden delivered a speech in New York City in which he labeled the deadly strike as the latest in a series of "dangerously incompetent" steps taken by Trump.

Just days after ending his campaign for president, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro is endorsing Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

The two will hold a rally together Tuesday evening in Brooklyn.

Updated at 2:06 p.m. ET

A three-month window that began with a heart attack ended as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' strongest fundraising quarter yet.

Sanders' campaign announced it raised $34.5 million in October, November and December — nearly $10 million more than he had raised in the previous quarter. According to the campaign, $18 million came in from 900,000 individual donations in December alone, as Sanders drew larger and larger crowds to rallies in early voting states such as Iowa and New Hampshire.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Former national security adviser John Bolton has kept a low profile since President Trump fired him back in September. Now he is emerging in an interview on NPR.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It was 2010, and Sen. Bernie Sanders had already been in Congress for nearly two decades. The Vermont independent had a long — and consistent — track record, but at that point, he hadn't yet emerged as a national figure on the left.

That quickly changed on Dec. 10, starting at 10:25 a.m. and over the following eight-and-a-half hours.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

The former law professor in the 2020 field is the only presidential candidate to earn an A in a new scorecard, released on Wednesday by the grassroots progressive group Indivisible.

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

California Sen. Kamala Harris is dropping out of the presidential race, citing a lack of funds. She informed her campaign staff of the decision on a conference call and later sent an email to supporters, in which she wrote "my campaign for president simply doesn't have the financial resources we need to continue."

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